BORDOGNI ROCHUT PDF

Giulio Marco Bordogni 23 January — 31 July , usually called just Marco Bordogni , was an Italian operatic tenor and singing teacher of great popularity and success, whose mature career was based in Paris. Bordogni was born in Gazzaniga , near Bergamo , Italy. He was a product of the Bergamo tenor school which originated with Giacomo David and Gaetano Crivelli , and in which can be counted, in addition to David's two best pupils namely his son Giovanni and Andrea Nozzari , both notable in Rossini 's operas , and besides Bordogni himself, also Domenico Donzelli and Giovanni Battista Rubini. Bordogni made his operatic debut in Novara in without initially meeting with much success. In he distinguished himself as a performer of the role of Argirio in Rossini's Tancredi [3] at the Ferrara revival with a tragic ending [4] and at the inauguration of the Teatro Re in Milan, and became later very active in promoting that composer's music. He appeared in many of Rossini's operas on their first presentation in various towns and theatres, mainly performing the roles originally sung by Giovanni David.

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Most players today are unaware that Rochut played in the Boston Symphony, and his tenure in Boston will be the story of a subsequent article on The Last Trombone. See the photo above of my early copy of Book I. But No. So who wrote it? Many people have assumed that Rochut composed this etude. It happens to be one of my favorite exercises in Book I and I, too, have puzzled over this, wondering who wrote it.

A few months ago, the mystery solved itself. And on page 12, exercise 11 is found:. What is this? Allard and Couillaud were the chickens; Rochut was the egg. Louis Allard and Henri Couillaud were trombone professors at the Paris Conservatoire; Allard from and Couillaud from So here we have a situation. Clearly authorship of the etude points to Allard and Couillaud , not Rochut Which begs the question: why did Rochut include it in his book when it had been published in another book in France the year before?

Was he paying tribute to his teacher? If so, why did he not credit Allard and Couillaud as the composers? Another haystack; another needle to be found. Detail from a photo of the Boston Symphony Orchestra brass section, And on page 12, exercise 11 is found: What is this?

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Bordogni / Rochut – Melodious Etudes for Trombone, Book 2

Most players today are unaware that Rochut played in the Boston Symphony, and his tenure in Boston will be the story of a subsequent article on The Last Trombone. See the photo above of my early copy of Book I. But No. So who wrote it? Many people have assumed that Rochut composed this etude. It happens to be one of my favorite exercises in Book I and I, too, have puzzled over this, wondering who wrote it. A few months ago, the mystery solved itself.

AL AHDATH AL MAGHRIBIA JOURNAL PDF

Bordogni, Marco (Rochut/Raph) Melodious Etudes, v.1 [revised] w/online audio accompaniment

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Marco Bordogni

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