HANAFUDA RULES PDF

It is a card game known to all but not necessarily played by many. It is a great way to learn some obscure kanji and vocabulary, add a neat Japanese social skill to your arsenal, and enjoy a piece of Japanese culture a little less known among foreigners. This is a casual blog and I am not a researcher, so I will simply be borrowing knowledge from the commons for the sake of convenience. All credit is given to the original authors and none of it is my own work. A cursory perusal of general playing card history indicates that the first set of playing cards ever created were in China.

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It has 48 cards divided into 12 months of the japanese calendar. Each month features a floral theme and symbols proposed by the japanese nature through the seasons of a year. This playing cards is also present in Korea hwatu and Hawaii.

The origins of Hanafuda come from the 16 th century when a portuguese missionary and his team brought a deck of 48 playing cards in Japan, Hombre, a card game from Spain. The japanese playing cards was only allowed among the nobility, therefore the portuguese game became quickly popular among the japanese lower class.

When Japan closed its borders, all foreign card games were banned. Therefore, several playing cards were created: a deck of 75 cards inspired by chinese warrior art and several decks of 48 cards that are close to the modern Hanafuda. Fallen into the hands of the japanese mafia, they were successively banned by the government because these cards were mainly used for gambling.

Following the change of government, Meiji, Japan opened its borders to the world and the playing cards was proclamed lawful again. Quickly adopted by the Yakuza as gambling, the Hanafuda also became popular with the public. Today, Hanafuda are playing in Japan, Korea and Hawaii, each with their own rules. In Japan, Nintendo still produces three versions of Hanafuda who differ in their quality of production: Napoleon deck, Tengu deck and the flower deck.

Hanafuda consists of 48 cards divided into 12 floral families of 4 cards, each family represents a month of the Japanese calendar, but can also be appropriate for the Gregorian calendar. Each card belongs to a card type with a set point value: 5 cards called Light 20 points , 9 cards called Tane or Animal 10 points , 10 cards called Tanzaku or Ribbon 5 points and 24 cards called Plain or Flower 1 point.

Koi-Koi Prerequisite: One deck of 48 Hanafuda cards Number of players: 2 Number of round: 6 or 12 Aim of the game: Score the most points at the end of 6 or 12 rounds by recovering the cards on the table.

To get a card, you need to match a card from the player's hand with a card from the table from the same month. The points are obtained by forming captured hands - yaku - with the cards that the player had recovered. How to determine the dealer: Each player draws a card and whoever is closest to the first month starts the game.

If two players have a card from the same month, one with a greater point value become the dealer. This player will distribute the cards.

Distribution: The dealer distributes 2 by 2, 8 cards per player and 8 cards on the table, the rest of the cards form the stock cards. On the table, if there are 4 cards from the same month, the dealer will distributes again; then, in the hand of each player, if a hand has 4 cards from the same month or 4 pairs of different months, the player gets 6 points and the round is over.

Play: Players take turns to get the cards on the table and form a yaku to score points. First step, the first player must match a pair with the same month with a card from his hand and a card on table. If on the table, there are three cards of the same month, the player gathers the four cards.

But if he doesn't find a matching card, he must discard one card from his hand on the table. Second step, he draws a card from the stock cards and try to match a pair in the same way as before. Last step, the player recovers one or two matching pairs of cards, he places beside him.

He checks whether he can form a yaku with the won cards. If no yaku is possible, his turn ends. By continuing, he may form a new yaku to increase his score at the end of the round. If each players has exhausted its 8 cards and none can form a yaku, the round ends with 0 points for each player, we go for the next round.

Rule of multiplication of points: At the end of a round, players will check whether: If a player scores more than 7 points, his score is doubled.

If a player scores points and his opponent had announced Koi, his score is doubled. If a player scores more than 7 points and his opponent had announced Koi, his score is quadrupled. End of the game: After the 6 or 12 rounds, the scores marked in each round are added, the player with the highest score wins. Yaku :.

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There is two kind of calling "Koi-koi" and "Stop", if you want to continue, you say "Koi-koi. Hanafuda are playing cards of Japanese origin karuta cards , used to play a number of games. The name literally translates as "flower cards". Koi-koi is a game for two players at a time.

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It has 48 cards divided into 12 months of the japanese calendar. Each month features a floral theme and symbols proposed by the japanese nature through the seasons of a year. This playing cards is also present in Korea hwatu and Hawaii. The origins of Hanafuda come from the 16 th century when a portuguese missionary and his team brought a deck of 48 playing cards in Japan, Hombre, a card game from Spain. The japanese playing cards was only allowed among the nobility, therefore the portuguese game became quickly popular among the japanese lower class. When Japan closed its borders, all foreign card games were banned. Therefore, several playing cards were created: a deck of 75 cards inspired by chinese warrior art and several decks of 48 cards that are close to the modern Hanafuda.

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